How to clean a metal bed frame?


Many people are often concerned about the proper technique for cleaning an iron bed frame. What products should they use? How often do I clean my metal bed frame? What if you find a mark on your bed frame? We can help with all these questions.

Solomon iron bed in black

What should my routine for cleaning my metal bed frame be?

A cleaning routine for your iron bed depends on how often you clean your bedroom and where you live. Our iron beds are durable, so you have some leeway. We recommend you clean your bed every time you clean your room. It’s okay to miss cleaning your bed frame once in a while if you can’t get to it for whatever reason.

To routinely clean your metal bed frame, use a soft dry cloth to wipe down all metal parts of your bed frame, including the base frame. That’s about it! You should only ever need to get rid of the dust from your bed frame. Once a month or so, you can wipe down your metal bed frame with a damp cloth and immediately follow this up with a soft dry cloth. It is essential to dry your bed immediately completely, or you chance rust forming on your frame.

How should I clean a stain on my metal bed frame?

If you have a stain or mark on your bed frame, we usually use a cloth that has been lightly wetted with soapy water and try to scrub the stain away. Immediately dry with a soft dry cloth.

If there’s a particularly stubborn stain, we use a dab of Brasso at the location where there is an issue and try to polish the stain away. This needs to be done with caution. We recommend using Brasso on our standard painted frames like Black, Ivory or White, which are powder coated finishes and have a thicker layer of paint than liquid paint, so are more forgiving. We do not recommend using Brasso with our designer paints or our metallic paints as they have a thinner final coat. Brasso on these finishes can cause too much erosion and ruining the finish. If you have any doubts, contact your manufacturer for further guidance.

Olivia iron bed in satin white

How should I clean rust from my metal bed frame?

Rust on a new metal bed frame

Firstly, it’s important to note that you should do everything possible to prevent your metal bed frame from rusting. Once it starts to rust, it’s difficult to tackle. To prevent your iron bed frame from rusting, try to keep your bed as dry as possible. While the paint on your iron bed prevents rust, any spills or moisture will lead to rust over time.

If your relatively new frame starts rusting, it’s best to get in touch with the manufacturer and try to get them to help. We offer a 5 year warranty, so if your frame rusts in that time you’re usually covered. Even after our warranty is over we try to help the customer keep their bed in service.

Rust on an old metal bed frame

If you have an old rusted frame, you have to follow the usual procedure for rusted painted metal. We usually try and locally use a wire brush to clean the large flakes of rust while trying not to disturb the non-rusted bits of your bed. Now you can use steel wool to remove the remainder of the rust. Make sure you see no rusted surfaces any more. If you need, you can use some fine grit sandpaper to smooth the part.

Finally, you can paint with some metal primer and then your choice of paint. Usually, this step requires you to repaint your whole bed to match your paint throughout your bed.

How to clean a brass bed frame?

Hamilton iron bed with brass parts

If your frame is made of brass, copper or any other raw metal, the procedure to clean your bed is different. Most brass beds sold today have a clear coat of lacquer which you should clean with a damp cloth and then dry immediately. These lacquers corrode with oils and other dirt so you need to be extra careful to make sure your bed lasts a long time.

If you have a pure brass bed without any lacquer then you can clean with a dry cloth. You will periodically also have to polish your bed with Brasso.

A clean bed is a happy bed

A clean and well-maintained metal bed frame will last you a long time and keep it’s pristine look for the life of its service. Mostly metal beds are designed to be protected from the elements and are forgiving.